Report: FAA shutters Florida firm supplying faulty Boeing 737 sensor

Boeing 737 MAX
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has shut down Xtra Aerospace, of Miramar, Fla., which supplied the faulty sensor to Lion Air that triggered the 2018 crash of a Boeing 737 MAX aircraft that killed 189 people, according to an online article on The Seattle Times. (Pixabay)

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has shut down Xtra Aerospace, the Miramar, Fla., supplier of a faulty sensor to Lion Air that triggered the 2018 crash of a Boeing 737 MAX that resulted in 189 deaths, according to an online article on The Seattle Times.

According to the report, the FAA has revocated Xtra’s aviation repair station certificate, essentially putting Xtra out of business.

Xtra has reportedly issued a statement saying that “we respectfully disagree with the agency’s findings.” The company added that the revocation of its certificate “is not an indication that Xtra was responsible for the accident.”

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According to the report, the news came the same day that the final investigation report into the Lion Air accident was released Friday by the National Transportation Safety Committee of Indonesia, known by its Indonesian acronym KNKT.

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