Gas sensor monitors hazardous environments

Wireless device monitors gaseous hazards in places where wired sensors are not practical
Wireless device monitors gaseous hazards in places where wired sensors are not practical (Pixabay)

Emerson has introduced two Rosemount 628 Universal Gas Sensors to measure carbon monoxide and oxygen depletion in addition to the existing capability to monitor hydrogen sulfide. These additions to the series provide a broader range of hazardous situations that can be monitored using the Rosemount 928 Wireless Gas Monitor platform.

The Rosemount 928 Wireless Gas Monitor continuously monitors the presence of toxic and combustible gases in remote, difficult-to-reach locations.
The Rosemount 928 Wireless Gas Monitor continuously monitors the presence of
toxic and combustible gases in remote, difficult-to-reach locations.​ (Emerson)

The Rosemount 928 Wireless Gas Monitor is a highly versatile platform for monitoring hazardous conditions in process plants, remote wellheads, pipelines, storage terminals and other process plants and facilities. It can be easily deployed using a WirelessHART network in areas considered too impractical or expensive for the installation of conventional wired infrastructure. Once monitors are integrated into the wireless network, personnel can simply check the gas levels at the remotely monitored locations.

To simplify installation and maintenance, the Rosemount 928 Gas Monitor has hot-swappable main components, including the power module and the Rosemount 628 toxic gas sensor. Both are intrinsically safe and can be replaced in the field in minutes without the need for tools. The Rosemount 628 sensor’s calibration information is stored within the sensor, not the transmitter. This allows users to calibrate the sensor in a non-hazardous location and take it to the field for quick exchanges with installed sensors. This further enhances personnel safety by minimizing their time spent in potentially hazardous locations.

The first Rosemount 628 Universal Gas Sensor was designed for hydrogen sulfide detection. With the addition of sensors for carbon monoxide and oxygen depletion detection, these monitors can now be used for other applications, or additional gas monitors can be deployed. When and if process conditions change, monitors can be moved as necessary, so long as they are placed within the coverage area of the WirelessHART network.

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Carbon monoxide can be released by various combustion processes, and concentration above 1,500 ppm is immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH). Processes able to consume oxygen can reduce atmospheric content in given areas, and any situation where oxygen drops below 19.5% is also IDLH. In many cases, more than one condition may exist at a given time, compounding the hazard.
 

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