DHS S&T, St. Louis launch Smart Cities tech pilot

smart cities
St. Louis, Missouri, is the location for a smart cities technology integration pilot launched by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T). (Pixabay)

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) is launching a smart cities technology integration pilot in St. Louis, Missouri, in collaboration with both the city and the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC).

Through this pilot, taking place at T-REX, the downtown St. Louis technology innovation center, the partners will research, design and test the Smart City Interoperability Reference Architecture (SCIRA) as an interoperable framework that integrates commercial proprietary Internet of Things (IoT) sensors for public safety applications at the community level.  The intended outcome of this smart city effort is to enhance public safety and efficient and effective operations across all city departments.

“With this pilot, we will be able to engage stakeholders in St. Louis to test how their technology can meet real city needs,” said William Bryan, Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Under Secretary for Science and Technology, in a statement. “The City of St. Louis joined the federal Smart Cities Initiative in an effort to improve public safety, among other objectives. We, at DHS S&T, are honored to work with the city and OGC as we continue to serve our colleagues in public safety.”

Sponsored by Infosys

Infosys positioned as a Leader in Gartner Magic Quadrant for IT Services for Communications Service Providers, Worldwide 2020

The Gartner Magic Quadrant evaluated 12 vendors and Infosys was recognized for its completeness of vision and ability to execute.
Infosys leverages its global partner ecosystem, CSP-dedicated studio, design tools, and 5G Living Labs to boost service delivery. Innovative solutions such as the ‘Infosys Cortex2’ are driving business value for CSPs.

RELATED: CIMCON joins Qualcomm smart cities accelerator program

“Community level application of existing technologies is essential for a 21st century city to adequately deliver services to its residents and provide for their public safety, as well as enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of all city services. The way our residents live, work and play is continuously evolving and their government must evolve with them. I am excited to be partnering with DHS S&T and OGC on this very important smart city effort,” Mayor Lyda Krewson said.

The goal of the SCIRA pilot is to integrate and test existing real-world technologies that can augment, and even improve, all day-to-day city operations and emergency response capabilities. The pilot will test the technologies’ performances and ability to enhance public safety via a series of major flooding, flash flooding, vulnerable population outreach, and building fire scenarios. Through the SCIRA project’s findings, cities could have open, interoperable methods for incorporating IoT sensors into city services and have standards across Smart Cities.

Suggested Articles

The overall data center system matters more than the CPU to CIOs, but investors responded poorly to Intel’s lower data centric chip sales

The world’s largest chipmaker saw a 47% decline in data center sales to enterprise and government, even as it forecast a full year 2020 record of $75B

Working with Jacoti of Belgium, Qualcomm wants to make earbuds recognize the hearing anomalies of users.