IoT Deployment Grabs Best Practices Award

Cloudera, Inc. announces that TDWI, a global provider of analytics and data management research and education, names Navistar's Internet-of-Things (IoT) deployment of Cloudera a winner of the 2017 Best Practices Award in the Big Data category. Navistar, a manufacturer of commercial trucks, buses, defense vehicles and engines, was chosen for its IoT-enabled connected vehicles and real-time diagnostics solution, powered by Cloudera, that helps manage and maintain hundreds of thousands of vehicles through predictive analytics.

 

Navistar uses Cloudera Enterprise Data Hub to gather and analyze 70+ unique data feeds from connected vehicles in real-time, across multiple telematics sources. Since adopting Cloudera, Navistar has been able to gain real-time visibility of more than 300,000 vehicles, help customers reduce maintenance cost and vehicle downtime up to 40%, and immediately reduce spending on proprietary hardware and disk solutions. By utilizing the platform, Navistar is now able to offer real-time monitoring and advanced vehicle diagnostics as value-added services for its customers, which include fleet owners, large enterprises, government agencies, and local school administration.  One Navistar customer was able to reduce the vehicle maintenance costs-per-mile from 12-15 cents to just under three cents for its large fleet.

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Learn more at the TDWI, Navistar, and Cloudera websites.

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