IoT Day 2019: Single Pair Ethernet An Easy Solution For Future IIoT

TE Connectivity and fellow connector producer HARTING are setting Single Pair Ethernet (SPE) as the de facto infrastructure to enable the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). The two companies will together drive solutions that define the infrastructure for SPE.

 

There are several SPE standards in IEEE 802.3 covering Ethernet technology for LANs and WANs. The latest, 802.3cg 10Base-T1, for distances up to 1 km, will be released in 2019. SPE allows for a single open, scalable Ethernet-based network within the automation system. This significantly reduces complexity, costs and enables to go beyond existing borders.

Free Newsletter

Like this article? Subscribe to FierceSensors!

The sensors industry is constantly changing as innovation runs the market’s trends. FierceSensors subscribers rely on our suite of newsletters as their must-read source for the latest news, developments and analysis impacting their world. Register today to get sensors news and updates delivered right to your inbox.

 

TE and HARTING are inviting other companies to partner up to drive Single Pair Ethernet as the infrastructure solution for the fast growing IIoT market. “Single Pair Ethernet is the technology on which we will build the road to the future success of the IIoT,” says Eric Leijtens, Global Product Manager Industrial Communication, TE Connectivity. “With the new interconnection standard IEC 63171-6, we have an outstanding opportunity to reap the full potential of the Industrial Internet of Things,” says Frank Welzel, Director Global Product Management, HARTING Electronics.

 

Want to get on board with SPE? Get more details by perusing the “Single-Pair Ethernet the infrastructure for IIoT” page.

 

TE Connectivity

Darmstadt, Germany

+49 6154 607 1740

http://www.te.com

Read more on

Suggested Articles

Builders and integrators don’t want to force homebuyers onto Google Nest over other systems

Users are uncomfortable about becoming dependent on wearables due to concern over inaccurate health measurements or malfunctions.

University of Illinois researchers have developed an affordable, reliable paper-based sensor to detect iron in fortified food products.