Bluetooth Sensor Beacon And Data Logger Offer Flexible Reporting Options

Fujitsu Components America expands its beacon offering with a Bluetooth 4.1 sensor beacon featuring data logging capability for on-demand reporting in remote monitoring and tracking applications, such as indoor navigation, asset management, and retail marketing. The FWM8BLZ02A-109069 beacon monitors temperature, inclination, vibration, and motion data and records it to non-volatile memory inside the beacon. It is capable of storing up to 68 hours of data at 60 second intervals, or 42 days of data at 15-minute intervals, with a maximum storage capacity of 32Kbytes.

 

 To reduce clutter in the network, data downloads to a host device can be user specified for preset intervals, on a schedule, or on demand via a Bluetooth router. Data can be transferred to a smartphone, tablet, or a Windows 8.1 or Windows 10 host device.

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 The beacon is based on Nordic Semiconductor’s Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) nRF51822 System-on-Chip (SoC) to control the wireless connectivity, sensors, LED, and battery management. The device measures 40 mm x 31 mm x 12mm and operates on a single CR2450 coin cell battery with a life expectancy of more than two years.

 

Other features include an operating temperature range of -30°C to +60°C, at 20% to 80% relative humidity. Peruse the FWM8BLZ02A-109069 datasheet for greater enlightenment.

 

Fujitsu Components America Inc.

San Jose, CA

800-380-0059

[email protected]   

http://www.us.fujitsu.com/components

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