Video Analytics App Takes New Product Of The Year Award

BrainChip, a developer of software and hardware accelerated solutions for advanced artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning applications, won the Security Today’s New Product of the Year Award 2017 in the Video Analytics category for its BrainChip Studio software suite. The award honors the outstanding products considered to be particularly noteworthy in their ability to improve security.

 

BrainChip Studio aids law enforcement and intelligence agencies to search vast amounts of video footage many times faster than previously possible, enabling them to quickly identify patterns or faces. Most significantly, the software can be utilized with existing infrastructure. The software suite simulates the spiking neural networks found in the human brain. It works with low-resolution video, even in noisy environments, and requires only a 24x24 pixel image to detect and classify faces and objects. Furthermore, BrainChip Studio can be trained on a single image in milliseconds and does not need the vast datasets, extended learning time or substantial compute power associated with other forms of video processing using artificial intelligence.

Sponsored by Digi-Key

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BrainChip Studio software runs under Windows or Linux. It is compatible with all major video encoding formats and is available to select law enforcement and intelligence agencies. More information on the BrainChip Studio product page.

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