Tiny RPMA Module Wedges Into Machine Networks

Based on RPMA (Random Phase Multiple Access) low-power wide-area (LPWA) technology, the SARA-S200 from u-blox is heralded as one of the smallest modules for the Machine Network. Operating in the globally license-free 2.4 GHz ISM (Industrial, Scientific and Medical) band, RPMA is at the heart of secure wireless networks operating in over 20 countries around the world. The Machine Network is a wireless network built by Ingenu, the creators of RPMA technology, exclusively for Machine-to-Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

 

The company has successfully ported the technology used in its first-generation RPMA modules and made it 65 percent smaller. Measuring just 16 mm by 26 mm by 2.3 mm in a Land Grid Array (LGA) package, SARA-S200 provides an easy migration between other u-blox form factors and cellular technologies thanks to nested design. Its low-power design (50 µW average power consumption in sleep mode) means it can operate for 10 years or longer from a single battery.

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The modules will be manufactured in ISO/TS 16949 certified facilities with guaranteed Quality of Service (QoS) and a secure design that meets NERC CIP and other industry-mandated critical infrastructure requirements. The SARA-S200 has been designed for industrial applications and offers an extended operating temperature of -40°C to +85°C. The first prototypes will be available in June 2017. For more information, visit http://www.u-blox.com

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