sureCore Delivers 40nmULP Memory Compiler

SHEFFIELD, England --- sureCore Ltd. announces the immediate availability of its TSMC 40nmULP process technology memory compiler. The new compiler facilitates utilization of sureCore's recently announced 40nm Ultra Low Voltage SRAM IP that effectively operates at a record-setting 0.6V across process voltage and temperature.

The new 40nm ULP compiler supports synchronous single port SRAM with operating voltages ranging from 0.6 to 1.21 volts and memory capacities ranging from 8Kbytes to 576Kbytes with maximum word lengths of 72bits.

Previous test chip results revealed an up to 80% savings in dynamic power consumption and a 75% reduction in static power.

The design targets power-critical "keep alive" IoT, wearable and medical applications and delivers up to 50% dynamic power savings. The SRAM itself is single rail and DVFS compatible. A rich suite of power management options include light sleep, deep sleep and power-down modes. The array is subdivided into up to eight banks that can be in independently active, retained or powered off modes. The compiler also provides Design-for-Test (DFT) and BIST support.

The sureCore low power SRAM IP is proving critical for a variety of IoT, wearable and medical applications that mandate keep alive memory. It enables automated spoken word or phrase recognition and over or under temperature events.

sureCore's Ultra Low power SRAM enables computing at formerly unattainable low voltages levels of 0.6V. By combining low voltage operation with the leakage characteristics of the underlying process, sureCore has created an SRAM that supports operating speeds down to 20MHz (at 0.6V) and exceeds 300MHz at 1.1V.

The company also has a 28nm FDSOI compiler and is currently working on a 22nm FDSOI Compiler, according to d'Eyssautier, who identified the technology as another popular IoT node.

For more details, visit http://www.sure-core.com

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