Oscilloscopes Add Support For HDMI v2.0 And Embedded DisplayPort

Oscilloscopes Add Support For HDMI v2.0 And Embedded DisplayPort
Teledyne LeCroy

The QPHY-HDMI2 and QPHY-eDP software options for the WaveMaster/SDA/DDA 8 Zi series oscilloscopes expand automated transmitter test solutions for display standards to include HDMI Version 2.0, and Embedded DisplayPort.

The QPHY-HDMI2 option provides a concise set of validation/verification and debug tools written in accordance with version 2.0 of the High Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) electrical test specification. HDMI test modes cover amplitude, timing, and jitter parameters. In addition to standard eye pattern and jitter tests for HDMI 2.0, the SDA real-time test equipment platform provides a complete set of amplitude and jitter measurements as defined in the HDMI specification. Use of an optional RF switch matrix for further test automation is fully supported, as is comprehensive fixture and switch de-embedding capability.

The QPHY-eDP software provides an automated test environment for running all of the real-time oscilloscope tests for sources in accordance with Version 1.4a of the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) Embedded DisplayPort PHY Compliance Test Guideline. QPHY-eDP supports testing at up to 5.4 Gb/s for full coverage of all bit rates included in the eDP 1.4 compliance test guideline. As with QPHY-HDMI2, optional RF switching and de-embedding is also supported by QPHY-eDP.

Both QPHY-HDMI2 and QPHY-eDP options have a list price of $7000. Both are available on WaveMaster 8Zi, LabMaster 9Zi, and LabMaster 10Zi oscilloscopes with bandwidths of 13 GHz or higher and running firmware version 7.9.x or later.

Teledyne LeCroy
Chestnut Ridge, NY
800-553-2769
http://www.teledynelecroy.com
 

Contact Info

Company: Teledyne LeCroy
Country: United States (USA)

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