Is That Meat Okay to Eat?

There's yet another food spoilage detector that can detect high levels of bacterial activity in poultry and other meats destined for the table. SensorfreshQ sniffs out biogenic amines that can be picked up by a handheld device that passes an air sample over the item of interest. The amines generate an electrical current that produces a color readout of green, yellow, or red (don't eat it). The ultimate plan is to include a version of the sensor in the product packaging. (www.sensorsmag.com/1206/RDMeat))

Suggested Articles

New sensors use the changing shape of nanowire combined with a piezoelectric material to produce enough energy to power the sensor.

Pleora Technologies sells a small interface to convert sensor data and video to packets, then send it over a 1 Gbps link.

Applications for Toposens’ “Bat Vision” TS3 sensors include navigation systems that mimic the echolocation techniques employed by bats and dolphins.