Marquette University’s “Smart Building” Provides a Real-World Look at Concepts in Action

MILFORD, OH– Integrated Test & Measurement (ITM) announces a “Smart Building” program in partnership with Marquette University. This unique initiative allows next generation structural engineers to perform large-scale experiments and obtain real-time results using data collected on the very building in which they are learning. ITM was selected to provide the technology and services for the program.

Powerful Software – Powerful Results

The system is powered by ITM’s configurable iTestSystem software platform. The software allows users to organize, acquire and view important engineering data using National Instruments (NI) hardware. Using iTestSystem, a building monitoring system was created to collect data from a weather station together with more than 120 strain gauge sensors installed along beams, braces and columns inside the Engineering Hall at Marquette University.

The system not only measures wind speed on the five story structure; it can actually “feel” the wind load during gusts and record its impact on the facility. Data is broadcast in real time to anyone plugged into the servers through their mobile device. Observing the data allows students to understand how a building’s systems “share lateral load” during wind events. In addition, instruments along support beams in the Engineering Materials and Structural Testing lab allow students to analyze moving loads as the crane moves around the bay. At the same time floor sensors measure the impact of people moving through the building. This information will impact future building design and potential building code modifications.

For more information, visit http://www.itestsystem.com
 

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