CAC Market On The Rise To $4.75 Billion

According to a market research "Computer Assisted Coding Market, By Service, By Application Global Forecast To  2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the Global Computer-Assisted Coding (CAC) Market is expected to reach USD 4.75 billion by 2022, at a CAGR of 11.5% during the forecast period.

 

  • By product and service, the CAC solutions segment accounted for the largest share of the market in 2016
  • By mode of delivery, the cloud-based solutions is expected to grow at the highest CAGR
  • By application, the automated computer-assisted encoding segment is projected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period
  • By end users, the  hospitals segment held the largest market share in 2016

 

North America dominated the market in 2016

 

In 2016, North America dominated the global Computer-Assisted Coding Market. Increasing government support for improving healthcare infrastructure, growing need for reducing healthcare costs, and advancements in healthcare facilities are driving the growth of the Computer-Assisted Coding Market in this region.

 

The key players in the Computer-Assisted Coding Market are 3M Health Information Systems (U.S.), Optum, Inc. (U.S.), Nuance Communications, Inc. (U.S.), McKesson Corporation (U.S.), Cerner Corporation (U.S.), Dolbey Systems, Inc. (U.S.), Precyse Solutions, LLC (U.S.), Craneware plc (U.K.), Artificial Medical Intelligence (U.S.), and TruCode (U.S.).

 

Browse 202 market data tables, 40 figures spread through 242 Pages and in-depth TOC of "Computer Assisted Coding Market" at http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/computer-assisted-coding-market-170644018

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