Kyocera’s concept coupe offers camouflage cockpit and smells great

Kyocera's concept car, called Moeye, creates a virtual 3D image of the road ahead and projects it onto the dashboard. Five different scents can be sprayed into the interior to match passengers' moods. (Kyocera)

 

Kyocera recently unveiled a concept car in Japan with “X-ray vision” to showcase what we might see with futuristic connected car technologies.

Called the Moeye, it is Kyocera’s second concept car. It is a full-sized proof-of-concept two-seater vehicle with most of the attention devoted to the interior space and a futuristic cockpit. The “X-ray” capability is actually optical camouflage technology to widen the passengers’ field of vision, the company said.

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The camouflage tech allows a passenger to see a virtual 3D image of the road ahead projected onto the dashboard, which renders the dashboard “functionally transparent,” Kyocera said.  A video of the experience explains the idea best, and it does appear to widen the passenger’s field of vision some.

optical camouglage for moeye

Kyocera, which sells rugged smartphones in the U.S., said the concept car suggests technologies for advances in autonomous driving and Mobility as a Service.  It was designed in collaboration with Prof. Masahiko Inami from the University of Tokyo’s Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology.

In addition to the camouflage, there is aerial display technology to project images in the space above the dashboard, including a character called Mobisuke to explain navigation and other instructions.

Ceraphic LED lighting, using Kyocera’s original technology, provides interior illumination to match natural sunlight that adjusts light in the morning and evening for greater comfort.

Touch and haptic feedback with Kyocera’s original Haptivity technology are provide in the instrument panel and center console. When a passenger touches the flat panel, fingertip pressure generates a tiny vibration.

A vibration speaker system using piezo elements radiates sound through the cabin using Kyocera original technology as well. The headrest is also equipped with a vibration speaker.

Kyocera also added customizable cabin fragrances. Passengers can choose among five fragrances that are sprayed into the cabin to match their mood.

Lead designer Ryuhei Ishmimaru, president of Fortmarei, described the overall Moeye design theme as “time” which embodies the history of the auto from traditional to the car of the future.  The exterior profile is a classic coupe but the details evoke a “clear sense of the future,” he said in a statement. “You can feel the future emerge from automotive tradition in ways that engage of the five human senses, rather than shape and design alone.”

The full-sized concept coupe is a traditional two-seater that is 13.2 feet in length, 5.6 feet wide and 4.7 feet high. It weighs 2,061 pounds, according to Kyocera.

 

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