Intel's new Stratix 10 accelerates some future Xeon processors

Intel is now shipping new Field Programmable Gate Arrays for hardware acceleration. (Intel)

Intel is now shipping new Intel Stratix 10 DX field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to help accelerate workloads in the cloud and in enterprises using Intel’s data center technology.

The FPGAs can be used with Intel Optane DC persistent memory dual in-line memory modules to increase bandwidth and hardware acceleration for some upcoming Intel Xeon Scalable processors.

Hardware accelerators like FPGA’s are increasingly important in server systems running heavy AI training or database workloads in many vertical industries, Intel noted.

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Accelerators can be used to process some workloads, leaving more CPU cores for higher priority workloads. VMWare is collaborating with Intel on FPGA and CPU acceleration. “Our mutual customers demand high performing, easy to use and reliable infrastructure,” said Krish Prasad, general manager of the cloud platform business unit at VMWare.

When the FPGAs are used with some future Xeon Scalable Processors, the Intel Ultra Path Interconnect will show 37% lower latency and a theoretical top transfer rate of 28 Gbps. The Stratix 10 DX is compared with other variants on an Intel web site along with other details.

RELATED: Intel catches AI bug at Hot Chips Conference with Nervana chip

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