Wi-Fi Chip Gives Batteries New Lease On Life

(InnoPhase)

InnoPhase unleashes the Talaria TWO platform, a complete wireless IoT solution integrated on a single chip. It contains a multiprotocol transceiver, MAC/PHY, digital power amplifier, and an embedded ARM processor. According to its maker, the Talaria TWO chip is designed for battery-based IoT applications and is optimized to be the lowest power Wi-Fi solution in the industry. It has the potential to create a whole new class of IoT products that can cut the power cord and be battery-based with a DTIM3 specification half that of leading wireless Wi-Fi solutions.

 

The device employs InnoPhase’s patented PolaRFusion radio architecture, which processes radio signals using polar coordinates rather than traditional IQ coordinates. This is said to dramatically reduce the amount of power required to transmit, process, and receive wireless information using industry standard wireless protocols. It achieves this by moving most of the radio signal processing from analog circuits, found in today’s IQ-architecture wireless solutions, into power and size efficient digital logic. For greater illumination, checkout the Talaria TWO wireless platform.

Sponsored by Infosys

In Conversation with Antonio Neri, President & CEO – Hewlett Packard Enterprise & Salil Parekh, CEO – Infosys

Hear the CEOs of Infosys & HPE discuss the current crisis and how it has accelerated the need for digital transformation for their clients. Connectivity at the Edge, right mix of hybrid cloud, ability to extract data faster than ever before… these are just some of the contributions that HPE and Infosys make to our clients’ digital transformation journey.
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