Where's My Field?

Even the best farming practices won't give you much of a crop if your land keeps disappearing from under you. The classic method of determining soil loss is to measure runoff rate and periodically collect either a single composite sample or several sequential samples. But agronomist Seth Dabney's work with turbidity sensors could help farmers (and researchers) create a continuous set of data on erosion and suggest ways to prevent it. Moreover, his technique is less expensive and labor intensive than collecting and analyzing runoff samples.



Dabney is using optical turbidimeters, which monitor the scattering of a beam of light when it encounters particles of dirt suspended in water. Thus far he has tested the sensors on cultivated fields ranging from just under 0.5 to 40 acres, installing 28 of them in pipes that discharge precipitation and irrigation runoff. Putting them in field outlets provides more accurate data than placement in a stream or river, where the sediment from other fields would give false readings.

Contact Seth Dabney, Agricultural Research Service, Oxford, MS; 662-232-2975, [email protected].

Sponsored by Infosys

In Conversation with Antonio Neri, President & CEO – Hewlett Packard Enterprise & Salil Parekh, CEO – Infosys

Hear the CEOs of Infosys & HPE discuss the current crisis and how it has accelerated the need for digital transformation for their clients. Connectivity at the Edge, right mix of hybrid cloud, ability to extract data faster than ever before… these are just some of the contributions that HPE and Infosys make to our clients’ digital transformation journey.

Suggested Articles

MIT Sloan and Boston Consulting Group call for expanding organizational learning to gain better financial rewards of AI deployments

Originally a 1960s memory manufacturer, Intel wants out of NAND following the market decline in 2018

Process could be used to apply sensors detect symptoms for COVID-19, and the sensors could be reusable