VESA Standard Optimizes Plug-and-Play Connectivity

The Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) updates its Display Identification Data (DisplayID) standard to version 2.0. The update promises to simplify connecting and configuring modern display products including PC monitors, consumer TVs and embedded displays (e.g., display panels within laptop and all-in-one systems). Allegedly, the result is a best-in-class plug-and-play experience. Advanced capabilities supported include 4K-and-higher resolutions, high dynamic range (HDR), augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR), and refresh rates of 120 Hz and above.

 

New Features In DisplayID 2.0

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Analog Devices ADIS16500/05/07 Precision Miniature MEMS IMU Available Now from Digi-Key

The Analog Devices’ ADI ADIS16500/05/07 precision miniature MEMS IMU includes a triaxial gyroscope and a triaxial accelerometer. Each inertial sensor in the MEMS IMU combines with signal conditioning that optimizes dynamic performance.

 

The key difference between DisplayID 2.0 and EDID predecessors is its modular structure, based on the concept of "data blocks" – individually defined, self-contained data formats that each provide a specific set of related display information in a clear unambiguous manner. This benefit affords unprecedented flexibility, as entire content can be constructed from any number of elements, predefined data blocks or descriptors. The specification addresses head-mounted and other types of wearable displays; provides a clearer way to define Adaptive-Sync (i.e., dynamic refresh rate); extends field sizes to support higher pixel counts; expands the magnitude of parameters needed to enable HDR; and supports high luminance, to name just a few of the advanced technologies that DisplayID 2.0 covers.

 

For more information, visit VESA.

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