UVC LEDs Break A Price Barrier

Crystal IS expands its Klaran platform with the release of the WD series LEDs, developed for the price and performance needs of point-of-use water (POU) water disinfection. The series is reportedly the first to break the $0.25/mW price barrier required for mass production of UVC LED based water purification products. The company will initially offer 30-mW and 40-mW versions with plans to introduce more powerful devices in the coming months.

 

“Our Aluminum Nitride substrates have always held the promise of superior cost for performance at the deep UV wavelengths,” said Larry Felton, CEO of Crystal IS. “Klaran WD series LEDs, developed specifically for point-of-use water, meet OEM requirements at a compelling price per milliwatt to drive innovation in water purification products.”

Sponsored by Digi-Key

Analog Devices ADIS16500/05/07 Precision Miniature MEMS IMU Available Now from Digi-Key

The Analog Devices’ ADI ADIS16500/05/07 precision miniature MEMS IMU includes a triaxial gyroscope and a triaxial accelerometer. Each inertial sensor in the MEMS IMU combines with signal conditioning that optimizes dynamic performance.

 

Klaran UVC LEDs are produced on a unique ultra-wide bandgap Aluminum Nitride substrate produced by Crystal IS. This substrate is said to overcome the material challenges inherent with traditional sapphire-based devices and emit their full germicidal power from the top of the chip, allowing for low cost, simpler packaging design. The resulting UVC LEDs offer high output at peak germicidal wavelengths (260-275 nm) and the ability to be operated at high drive currents for more effective disinfection. For more information, visit Crystal IS.

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