Unique recoveriX uses state-of-the-art neurotechnology that leads to success even in the case of chronic disorders.

SCHIEDLBERG, Austria -- Mrs. Savin suddenly suffered a stroke. It came without warning, and left her right arm completely paralyzed. After participating in recoveriX-therapy, she was soon able to move her right arm again. recoveriX uses state-of-the-art neurotechnology that leads to success even in the case of chronic disorders.

Stroke - A Widespread Disease

Every year, around 15 million people suffer a stroke. About one third of these people don't survive. Another third suffer ongoing physical impairment. And sometimes people remain paralyzed. recoveriX re-connects brain and body. Also, when standard therapy can no longer yield any further benefit, recoveriX provides a second chance for improvement.

The Power of the Mind

A stroke might inhibit the ability to move, but not the ability to imagine movement! During recoveriX therapy, patients imagine a hand or a foot movement. A Brain-Computer Interface measures their brain activity. Virtual Reality shows the movement on the screen, which generates visual feedback in real-time. At the same time, imagined movement becomes a real movement through stimulation of the affected muscles. reocoveriX activates mirror neurons that help the brain find new ways to perform independent movement again.

Dr. Christoph Guger: "recoveriX couples cognitive processes with movements, and this is what makes rehabilitation effective. In one case, we had a patient whose arm had been paralyzed for 4 years. After only 10 recoveriX sessions, this patient could move again."

Watch an interview with Mrs. Savin: https://youtu.be/llv6pwufnMw

For more info:
http://www.gtec.at
http://www.recoverix.at

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