Toshiba's TSV Technology Wins Best of Flash Memory Summit Award

IRVINE, CA -- Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc. (TAEC) announces that its Through Silicon Via (TSV) technology has earned a 'Best of Flash Memory Summit (FMS) 2015' award from Tom's Hardware. A leading tech industry publication, Tom's Hardware acknowledged standout products that were announced at FMS earlier this month.

Toshiba has developed the world's first 16-die stacked NAND flash memory that uses TSV technology. This new breakthrough provides an effective solution for low latency, high bandwidth and high IOPS/Watt in flash storage applications, including high-end enterprise SSDs. Toshiba's TSV technology achieves an I/O data rate of over 1Gbps, which is higher than any other NAND flash memory, while reducing power consumption by approximately 50 percent with low voltage supply.

"TSV technology is another NAND industry first for Toshiba, and we are very excited about the increases in performance and reductions in power consumption it can bring to high density applications, such as SSDs," noted Scott Nelson, senior vice president of TAEC's Memory Business Unit. "Having our technology recognized by a premier outlet such as Tom's Hardware is further validation of our NAND flash leadership role."

Also included among the highlights at Toshiba's booth at FMS was the next generation of its BiCS FLASH™. This innovative technology is the world's first*3 48-layer TLC 3-bit-per-cell 256Gb*4 (32GB) 3D memory.

For more information, visit:
http://www.toshiba.com/taec/adinfo/technologymoves
http://www.toshiba.com/taec

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