Toshiba Broadens Optoelectronics Portfolio, Adds New Transistor Photocouplers

IRVINE, CA -- Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc. launches two new four-channel transistor photocouplers: the TLP292-4 and TLP293-4. Small package sizes and extended temperature ranges make the new photocouplers suitable for applications including programmable controllers, switching power supplies and simplex/multiplex data transmissions.

With wide operating temperature ranges (Ta=-55 to 125 degrees C), and high isolation voltages (3750Vrms), the two new photocouplers can be used for a variety of high-density surface mount applications. Both the TLP292-4 and TLP293-4 are housed in SO16 packages – giving designers the ability to meet the space saving requirements of increasingly smaller, thinner end products.

Both of the new photocouplers are comprised of phototransistors optically coupled to InGaAs infrared emitting diodes. The TLP292-4 is connected in an inverse parallel configuration, and can operate directly by AC input current.

Both the TLP293-4 and the TLP292-4 support low input current while maintaining a high current transfer ratio. Current transfer ratio ranks specified at a low LED input current of IF=0.5mA are available. When utilized at low LED currents, these products can significantly contribute to a reduction in power consumption.

Features of the TLP292-4 and TLP293-4 include:
•Collector-Emitter Voltage: 80 V (min)
•Current Transfer Ratio: 50 percent (min), Rank GB: 100 percent (min)
•Low current input support: CTR rank specified at IF=0.5mA available
•Isolation Voltage: 3750 Vrms (min)
•Operation temperature range: -55 to 125 degrees C
•Safety standards approval – UL, cUL, CQC, VDE

Toshiba's new photocouplers are available now.

Visit Toshiba's web site for more info at:
http://www.toshiba.co.jp/index.htm
http://www.toshiba.com/taec

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