Tire Technology Achieves A Milestone

(Tyrata)

Tyrata has achieved what the company believes is a significant milestone in the development of its IntelliTread real-time tread wear sensors. IntelliTread sensors use wireless signals to track millimeter-scale changes in tread depth. When commercially available, the sensors will signal when it's time to replace tires or report information about uneven and often dangerous tire wear conditions.

 

Numerous tire-related accidents are due to worn tires, yet, the only common method to determine tread depth is to manually gauge the tire, such as with a penny held in one of the grooves. While integrated tire pressure sensors have provided improvements in safety, the industry is in need of a way to monitor the thickness of a tire’s tread in real time.

Sponsored by Infosys

Infosys positioned as a Leader in Gartner Magic Quadrant for IT Services for Communications Service Providers, Worldwide 2020

The Gartner Magic Quadrant evaluated 12 vendors and Infosys was recognized for its completeness of vision and ability to execute.
Infosys leverages its global partner ecosystem, CSP-dedicated studio, design tools, and 5G Living Labs to boost service delivery. Innovative solutions such as the ‘Infosys Cortex2’ are driving business value for CSPs.

 

Tyrata’s technology can monitor, track, and predict tread wear over the life of any tire. IntelliTread sensors determine tread depth using proprietary sensor and electronic technology mounted inside of the tire. When a voltage is applied to the sensor, an electrical signal passes through the tire. As the rubber wears down, the signal changes. Sensor electronics use these signal changes to determine the tire's tread depth, which can then be wirelessly transmitted for further analytics and/or displayed to the consumer. For more details, visit Tyrata, and/or contact Luka Lojk at [email protected] or 704-593-8418.

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