Through-Beam Laser Sensors Act Like Proximity Devices

BEA Lasers’ latest Eagle Eye Sensor in a single package contains both a through-beam photoelectric laser source (emitter) and a receiver, providing a similar function as a proximity sensor.  The combination emitter/receiver package is viable for detecting the presence of objects, such as products on an assembly line, material or liquid level control, product positioning or profiling, and other applications.  The housing and components are ruggedized to withstand the ambient stresses of a factory environment and the set is also IP67 rated.

 

The Eagle Eye sensor is available with a red (650 nm) laser, and a dot optic.  The laser is pulsed / modulated, which helps the receiver to distinguish the signal from extraneous light and achieve a long sensing range. Maximum operating distance between the emitter and the receiver, or sensing range, is 20 meters. An object is detected when the sensing path is interrupted between the two components.  The effective beam size of a standard Eagle Eye through-beam laser sensor has been “apertured” to detect small parts, inspect small profiles or accurately sense position.

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Pricing for BEA Eagle Eye Sensors starts at $100 per set, with volume pricing discounts available.  For more knowledge, visit BEA Lasers and/or call 800-783-2321 in the US.  In Canada or Mexico, call 847-238-1420.

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