Thermoelectric Modules Keep CMOS Sensors Cool

Laird Thermal Systems expands its Peltier thermoelectric module product family with the HiTemp ET Series, designed to protect components like CMOS sensors in high temperature applications. Sensitive CMOS sensors convert photons to electrons for digital processing. Thermal noise causes CMOS sensors to lose image resolution as temperature increases. This can occur in many outdoor applications, where heat generated by surrounding electronics exceeds the maximum operating temperature of the CMOS sensor. To prevent image quality from deteriorating, high temperature Peltier coolers can reduce the sensor’s temperature, maintaining acceptable noise levels.

The HiTemp ET Series thermoelectric modules deliver spot cooling and are said not to degrade in high heat environments. To meet a broad range of requirements, the HiTemp ET Series includes 53 models offering a variety of heat pumping capacities, geometric form factors and input voltages. Their enhanced Peltier module construction prevents copper diffusion and degradation in performance. It maintains a high coefficient of performance (COP) allowing for maximum heat removal into the air.  

Offering active cooling for applications operating in temperatures ranging from 80°C to 150°C, the HiTemp ET Series offers a cooling capacity of more than 300W in a compact form factor with a temperature control accuracy of ±0.01°C. For more information, checkout the HiTEmp ET Series page.

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