Thermal Analysis Software Readies For R&D Work

FLIR Systems’ FLIR Research Studio thermal imaging software targets research-and-development (R&D) and science professionals. Available for a free trial download, the software is designed for use across multiple platforms and in 22 languages. In combination with a FLIR thermal imaging camera for science applications, FLIR Research Studio provides an ideal solution for R&D teams. 

 

Said to be easy-to-use and optimized for collaboration for users at all levels, Research Studio provides the tools needed for analyzing complex live and recorded thermal data and collecting meaningful results. Available for Windows, MacOS, or Linux, Research Studio users can record and evaluate data across platforms from multiple FLIR science cameras and recorded sources simultaneously.

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Rich with features such as custom workspaces, FLIR Research Studio helps research and development teams work efficiently and productively. Plug-and-play connections with multiple FLIR thermal cameras and a simplified “connect, record, share” workflow allow users to quickly start collaborating. Users can also save their workspaces to allow colleagues to view the results and export videos, CSV files, and other third-party formats for easier sharing and reporting. With the addition of multiple language options for precise translation, these features help reduce the potential for misinterpretation of results and increase efficiency.

 

FLIR Research Studio is available for purchase now starting at $300 USD or as a free trial download. For more information, checkout Research Studio.

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