Stress Mapping Predicts Materials Failure

Quick, accurate location and measurement of potential failure points in materials is the focus of a second-generation neutron residual stress mapping instrument being developed jointly by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee. The project, headed by Cam Hubbard of ORNL's Metals and Ceramics Division, uses high-flux neutron beams from the lab's high-flux isotope reactor to measure residual stress and create a 3D map that pinpoints high-stress locations of likely materials failure.

The instrument can also study the grains in a material and the way they behave under deformation, thus helping to improve the manufacturing of engines, nuclear reactors, large steel machinery, and equipment used in heat recovery systems. The technique is applicable to a wide range of materials, including iron, aluminum, titanium, magnesium, and various metal matrix composites, and was recently used to strengthen concrete and to understand powder compaction.

DOE's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies is funding the research.

Industry Event

Sensors Expo & Conference

Register now and save with Early Bird Rates – Limited Passes Available!

North America’s can’t-miss event dedicated to sensors, connectivity, and IoT will take place this June 22-24 in San Jose, CA. Attendees can make connections, collaborate with experts & peers, get insight into emerging technology & trends, and find new approaches to evergreen challenges. Use promo code FE100 for $100 off Conference Passes.

Contact Cam Hubbard, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN; 865-574-4472, [email protected], www.ornl.gov.

Suggested Articles

Purdue University researchers are creating technologies to help compress 3D camera files and automate focus and exposure settings.

A $2.2 trillion economic relief package is anticipated to give the struggling U.S. economy a shot in the arm.

Micron also sees long-term growth for DRAM and NAND, with NAND in the 30% range