SENSORS EXPO: MEMS Process Enables Miniaturized Low-Power Gas Sensor Applications

Micralyne Inc. introduces standard silicon process technologies and process modules for the development and production of gas sensors. These new capabilities expand existing standard MEMS building blocks and provide the designer with miniaturized, low-power gas sensing structures required to address current Gas Sensors market trends.

 

The Gas Sensors market is changing dramatically; driven by new large-volume consumer applications such as smart IoT enabled wearables and regulatory changes related to environmental air quality. Incumbent gas sensing technologies are experiencing new technical challenges such as dramatic size reduction, low power, increased selectivity, detection of different types of gases, and wide operating temperatures.

Industry Event

Sensors Expo & Conference

Register now and save with Early Bird Rates – Limited Passes Available!

North America’s can’t-miss event dedicated to sensors, connectivity, and IoT will take place this June 22-24 in San Jose, CA. Attendees can make connections, collaborate with experts & peers, get insight into emerging technology & trends, and find new approaches to evergreen challenges. Use promo code FE100 for $100 off Conference Passes.

 

Micralyne started providing standard processes and MEMS building blocks in 2006 with an effort to lower the development costs and accelerate time to market of sensor products.   With the 2012 introduction of MicraGem-Si and subsequent release of MicraSilQ, Micralyne has maintained a focused commitment to enable MEMS process standardization for silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and wafer level packaging (WLP). 

 

Micralyne will be exhibiting at Sensors Expo booth #333, San Jose, California June 27-29, 2017. For more info, visit http://www.micralyne.com

Suggested Articles

Dutch companies invite hospitals to use AI tool on X-rays instead of CT scans

NPD Group says monitor sales doubled in the U.S. in the first half of March

“Our moonwalk equivalent” is how one National Instruments worker describes the colossal effort to provide hundreds of thousands of ventilators.