ON Semiconductor Imaging Technology Plays Integral Role in World’s First Multi-Aperture Computational Camera

NEW YORK --- ON Semiconductor driving energy efficiency innovations, has drawn on its extensive expertise in image sensor technology to help support Silicon Valley start-up Light. The company has provided Light with key imaging hardware for its game-changing L16 camera solution, which utilizes advanced computational processing to set new performance benchmarks.

ON Semiconductor recognized very early on that there would be an adoption of a multi-sensor approach to imaging within the consumer imaging markets. This has now been validated, with several dual camera systems. The Light L16 takes this trend much further, employing 16 image sensors that are distributed across the front surface of the camera to present the user with a light capture area equal to, or even exceeding, that of many digital single lens reflex (DSLR) cameras currently on the market. The L16 thereby enables dramatic improvements in resolution and optical zoom, while remaining aligned with the streamlined form factors of the handsets.

Through close collaboration with Light, ON Semiconductor was able to supply specially customized sensor devices, based on its 1/3.2-inch format AR1335 CMOS image sensor product offering. These had the cutting-edge pixel technology and inherent compactness necessary to meet both the unique configuration and elevated operational demands of the L16. With up to 10 sensor devices capturing image data simultaneously, this solution delivers an impressive 52 megapixel (MP) resolution, plus over 5X optical zoom without any degradation in image quality.

For more details, visit:
https://light.co
http://www.onsemi.com

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