Self-Powered Bluetooth Sensor Performs Intelligent Lighting Control

EnOcean’s Easyfit (EMDCB) solar-powered occupancy sensor for Bluetooth lighting control systems is said to be the first of its kind on the market. The ceiling-mounted solar-powered occupancy sensor (PIR) will be the first self-powered Bluetooth occupancy sensor on the market integrating the company’s energy harvesting technology.

 

The self-powered sensor uses a passive infrared (PIR) sensor to detect motion and integrates tiny solar cells to harvest ambient light. These solar cells generate the energy for the sensor’s operation making it self-powered and maintenance-free. An energy storage element stores the harvested energy bridging a period when no light is available to ensure an uninterrupted operation.

Fierce AI Week

Register today for Fierce AI Week - a free virtual event | August 10-12

Advances in AI and Machine Learning are adding an unprecedented level of intelligence to everything through capabilities such as speech processing and image & facial recognition. An essential event for design engineers and AI professionals, Engineering AI sessions during Fierce AI Week explore some of the most innovative real-world applications today, the technological advances that are accelerating adoption of AI and Machine Learning, and what the future holds for this game-changing technology.

 

Besides occupancy detection, the sensor integrates a light sensor that allows light level control based on the actual light intensity. Like the battery-free Easyfit switches, the sensor also has a Near Field Communication (NFC) interface to be easily integrated and commissioned for lighting control systems via a NFC reader, a smartphone or a tablet.

 

In addition, the EMDCB offers advanced security mechanisms for protected data communication. The sensor’s algorithm uses AES 128 authentication based on the device-unique random security key to generate a 32-bit signature which is transmitted as part of the radio telegram. Therefore, all transmitted radio telegrams are authenticated via AES 128 to ensure data integrity and authenticity. For more info, visit EnOcean.

Suggested Articles

Hydrogen refueling stations are limited in the U.S., restricting interest in use of fuel cell electric cars


Silicon Labs is providing the BT module needed for detecting proximity with another Maggy device

Test automation won't fix everything, but can help, according to an automation engineer. Here are five problems to avoi to improve chances of success