RoboKiller Wins FTC's National Anti-Robocall Contest

SOUTH AMBOY, NJ – RoboKiller mobile app, which kills robocalls before they ring, has won the $25,000 Grand Prize in the Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) Robocalls: Humanity Strikes Back competition. The competition sought the best solutions to a problem that plagues millions of consumers: annoying and fraudulent pre-recorded telemarketing calls. RoboKiller is seeking contributors to a Kickstarter campaign to bring its working beta to production.

The RoboKiller Team proved that its approach identifies and stops robocalls with incredible accuracy. "With RoboKiller, robocalls never reach your phone - but the calls you want always ring through," said Ethan Garr, RoboKiller's co-inventor. "We hear too many stories of people getting hurt by scams that start from pre-recorded telemarketing messages, and it's a problem we realized we could solve on any phone, even landlines."

RoboKiller's robo analytics engine uses audio-fingerprinting to determine if a call's audio is human or robotic. Calls that come from machines or illegal sources are forwarded to the app's' SpamBox, and only legitimate calls ring through. Powerful customization features including blacklist, whitelist, and do-not-disturb settings give users complete control of their phones and freedom from robocalls.

For more info, go to:
http://www.robokiller.com
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/485600868/robokiller-app-stop-telemarketing-robocalls-forever
https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2015/08/ftc-awards-25000-top-cash-prize-contest-winning-mobile-app-blocks

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