Respiration Sensor Embarks As A Smaller, Flexible Upgrade

Unveiled and ready for sale, the RAS-45 adult and pediatric acoustic respiration sensor is groomed for use with the rainbow Acoustic Monitoring (RAM) system. The RAS-45 sensor offers the same performance as the currently available RAS-125c sensor but in a smaller size and with a more flexible adhesive.

 

RAM noninvasively and continuously measures respiration rate using an adhesive sensor with an integrated acoustic transducer, previously Masimo’s RAS-125c and now the RAS-45. The sensor is applied to the patient’s neck area. Using acoustic signal processing that leverages the company’s signal extraction technology, the respiratory signal is separated and processed to display continuous respiration rate (RRa) and respiratory waveform, with the option to listen to the sound of breathing from the acoustic sensor.

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With its smaller size, RAS-45 is suited for monitoring pediatric patients and patients with shorter necks. Its adhesive is transparent, lighter, and more flexible than the RAS-125c adhesive. Like RAS-125c, RAS-45 operates with Masimo MX technology boards to measure RRa, display the acoustic respiration wave form, and optionally allow clinicians to listen to the sound of breathing. Both sensors are for use with patients who weigh more than 10 kg.

 

For additional information about the RAS sensors and rainbow Acoustic Monitoring (RAM) system, a product brief with specs and data is available. For more details, contact Masimo Corp.

Irvine, CA. 800-326-4890

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