Raytheon awarded US Navy Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar contract

TEWKSBURY, MA -- Raytheon Company has been awarded a $92,069,954 cost-plus-incentive-fee contract for the engineering and manufacturing development of the Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar. EASR will consist of two configuration variants: Variant 1, a rotating phased array; and Variant 2, a three-face fixed-phased array.

Raytheon will build, integrate and test an EASR engineering development model (EDM). The base contract begins with design work leading to preliminary design review, and culminating with system acceptance of the EDM at the end of testing. This contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $723,063,945.

Work will be performed in Sudbury, Massachusetts (63.6 percent); Fairfax, Virginia (9.5 percent); Andover, Massachusetts (7.2 percent); Stafford Springs, Connecticut (4.2 percent); East Syracuse, New York (4.0 percent); High Ridge, Missouri (2.6 percent); Flemington, New Jersey (2.0 percent); Indianapolis, Indiana (1.9 percent); Lawrenceville, Georgia (1.8 percent); Eau Claire, Wisconsin (1.7 percent); and Big Lake, Minnesota (1.5 percent), and is expected to be completed by February 2020.

Fiscal 2016 research, development, test and evaluation funding in the amount of $11,000,000 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with one offer received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington Navy Yard, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-16-C-5370).

For more info, go to http://www.raytheon.com
 

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