Raytheon awarded $564 million contract for Joint Polar Satellite System instruments

EL SEGUNDO, CA -- Raytheon Company has received a $564 million contract modification award from NASA for two satellite sensors as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Polar Follow-On missions.

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensors are for two satellites in the series, Polar Follow-On /JPSS-3 and JPSS-4. These are the fourth and fifth VIIRS units Raytheon has been contracted to build.

The first Raytheon-built VIIRS instrument is currently flying on the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite launched in 2011. The company has delivered a second VIIRS sensor for JPSS-1, scheduled for launch in 2017 and is currently building a third VIIRS unit for JPSS-2, planned for launch in 2021.

VIIRS collects imagery in 22 bands of light – from visible to infrared – allowing scientists to observe emerging weather and climate patterns in unprecedented detail. The data is also used for planning military operations.

JPSS is a collaborative effort between NOAA and NASA that ensures continuity of observational data at the quality levels needed to sustain current weather forecasts. NOAA is responsible for managing and operating the JPSS satellites. NASA, funded by NOAA, is responsible for developing and building the JPSS instruments, spacecraft, launch services and major components of the ground segment.

For more info, go to http://www.raytheon.com
 

Free Newsletter

Like this article? Subscribe to FierceSensors!

The sensors industry is constantly changing as innovation runs the market’s trends. FierceSensors subscribers rely on our suite of newsletters as their must-read source for the latest news, developments and analysis impacting their world. Register today to get sensors news and updates delivered right to your inbox.

Suggested Articles

Analyst calls the move “very troubling” and a defensive move after US- China fallout

IVY could help automakers adapt their vehicles based on data about how sensors see reactions to road hazards and driver behavior

Bosch is collaborating with Cartesiam for software to apply to its XDK dev kit