QuickLogic’s EOS Platform Debuted As The World’s Most Advanced Sensor Processing SoC

Sunnyvale, CA –QuickLogic Corporation’s EOS platform incorporates a revolutionary architecture that enables the industry’s most advanced and computationally intensive sensor-driven applications at a fraction of the power consumption of competing technologies. The EOS platform is a multi-core SoC that incorporates three dedicated processing engines. These include QuickLogic’s proprietary, patent-pending microDSP-like Flexible Fusion Engine (FFE), an ARM Cortex M4F Microcontroller (MCU), and a front-end sensor manager. The FFE and sensor manager handle the bulk of the algorithm processing, which minimizes the duty cycle for the floating point MCU. This approach dramatically lowers aggregate power consumption, and enables mobile, wearable and IoT device designers to introduce next generation sensor driven applications, such as pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), indoor navigation, motion compensated heart rate monitoring, and other advanced biological applications within their power budgets. The EOS platform includes a hardened subsystem specifically designed for always-listening voice applications. With its dedicated PDM-to-PCM conversion block, and Sensory™’s Low Power Sound Detector (LPSD) technology, the EOS system enables always-on voice triggering and recognition while consuming less than 350 microAmps, far better than traditional MCUbased solutions. The EOS platform provides the unique benefit of 2,800 effective logic cells of in-system reprogrammable logic that can be used for an additional FFE or customer-specific hardware differentiated features. No other sensor processing system on the market offers the combination of hardware and software flexibility, computational capacity, and the micro-power operation provided by the EOS platform. The EOS SoC is designed to maximize the efficiency of QuickLogic’s extensive SenseMe™ algorithm library. The EOS S3 platform and SenseMe library are compliant with Android Lollipop as well as various Real Time Operating Systems (RTOS). Since the platform is sensor and algorithm agnostic, it can support third party and customer-developed algorithms through QuickLogic’s industry-standard Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE) plugin. The IDE provides optimized and proven code generation tools as well as a feature-rich debugging environment to ensure quick porting of existing code into both the FFE and the ARM M4F MCU of the EOS S3 platform. Based on research data published by IHS iSuppli, the total available market for sensor processing solutions in smartphone, tablet and wearable applications will reach 2 billion units in 2019. "We expect that the annual market for embedded processors as sensor hubs in handsets, tablets and wearable health and fitness devices will exceed 2.0 billion units by 2019," said Tom Hackenberg, Principal Analyst at IHS Technology. This market growth is driven by an increase in the number of sensors in each product as the devices transition from simple products like pedometers, to sophisticated, multipurpose devices that feature always-on capabilities. Providing these demanding capabilities without sacrificing battery life makes power consumption a major factor in the success of these advanced devices. Power efficient sensor hubs, such as QuickLogic’s EOS platform, will be the enabling hardware that allows device designers to quickly and easily incorporate multiple advanced features without increasing power drain." Some of the target applications include but are not limited to: • Always-on, always-listening voice recognition and triggering • Pedometry, pedestrian dead reckoning, and indoor navigation • Sports and activity monitoring • Biological and environmental sensor applications • Sensor fusion including gestures and context awareness • Augmented reality • Gaming For more information, visit http://www.quicklogic.com
Read more on

Suggested Articles

MachineMetrics cloud-based platform allows sharing of IP with machine customers

Analog Devices' Ron Kapusta discusses the company's involvement in LiDAR with FierceElectronics.

Contracts require six EU manufacturers to buy from Broadcom exclusively, EU says