Qualcomm Intends to Collaborate with Google on Android Things OS

SAN DIEGO, CA -- Qualcomm Technologies, Inc., intends to collaborate with Google to add support for the new Android Things operating system (OS) in Qualcomm Snapdragon processors. Android Things is a new vertical of Android designed for Internet of Things (IoT) devices. By using their expertise in Android and Snapdragon processors to support development of a variety of connected devices aimed at both consumer and industrial applications, this initiative intends to help a vast number of developers participate in the IoT opportunity.

The design of IoT devices can be a complex task, usually requiring developers to bring together multiple connectivity technologies, sensors, data processing and storage, advanced multimedia and user interfaces, security, cloud integration, device management, as well as over-the-air upgrades and services. Development can be particularly challenging in fragmented OS ecosystems lacking a consistent environment, software tools and support required to create world-class applications.

Qualcomm Technologies and Google are uniquely positioned to address these challenges. We anticipate Android Things running on Snapdragon processors will offer developers familiar connectivity environments, including cellular, Wi-Fi® and Bluetooth®; support for a wide array of sensors; camera, graphics, multimedia and rich UI capabilities; hardware-based security; Google services and cloud integration; test and optimization tools, and more – allowing for rapid development of scalable, cost-effective and security-focused IoT solutions.

Android Things is in developer preview and is anticipated to be released more broadly next year on Snapdragon processors. For more details, visit https://www.qualcomm.com
 

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