Processor Supervisor Monitors Voltage With Programmable Delay

Diodes’ PT7M3808 family of microprocessor supervisory circuits monitor system voltages from 0.4V to 5V and a feature threshold accuracy from 0.5% and an adjustable delay time from 1.25 ms to 10 ms, Reportedly, this allows the devices to enable power-on reset functionality for microprocessors and other digital systems while also consuming minimal power. Applications include notebook and desktop computers, and battery-powered portable equipment for markets ranging from data centers to security systems.

 

Offered in fixed-threshold versions for standard voltage rails between 0.9V and 5.0V, and with an adjustable threshold version down to 0.4V, the PT7M3808 uses a precision reference to provide a 0.5% negative-going input threshold accuracy when monitoring voltages up to 3.3V and 1% accuracy at voltages from 3.3V to 5.0V. The delay time is adjusted from 1.25ms to 10ms by connecting an external capacitor to the CT pin; a longer 20ms delay can be achieved by disconnecting the CT pin, while a 300ms delay is possible by connecting the CT pin to VDD with a resistor.

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The PT7M3808 has a very low quiescent current, typically 2.8µA, making it well-suited for battery-powered applications. Available in SOT26 and DFN2020-6 packages, the PT7M3808 takes up very little board space for both new and drop-in replacement designs. If you thirst for greater knowledge, a PT7M3808 datasheet is available for your perusal delights.

 

Diodes Inc.

Plano, TX

972-987-3900

https://www.diodes.com

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