Popular Thermal Fuse Adds A Shunt

SCHURTER’s RTS thermal fuse for SMD mounting is now available with an integrated shunt. Thermal runaway refers to the overheating of a power semiconductor due to a self-reinforcing, heat- producing process omnipresent in the trend toward circuit miniaturization. The RTS protects these power semiconductors against thermal runaway. In such an event, the thermal fuse interrupts the circuit at a precisely defined temperature as a fail-safe device.

 

The RTS and RTS with shunt sustain operating currents up to 130A at rated voltages of up to 60 Vdc in a package measuring 6.6 x 8.8 mm in size.  The shunt version has an integrated resistance with a very low temperature dependence. This resistance, known as a shunt, enables precise current measurement and enables an additional, non-thermal circuit protection, e.g. via a controller.

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The RTS can be mounted using conventional reflow soldering techniques with temperature profiles up to 260°C. After the solder process, the RTS is mechanically activated by depressing the top into place, arming the RTS to trip at 210°C. It can be performed manually or automatically in the case of several devices being activated at once.

 

 

The RTS meets the requirements of AEC-Q200 and MIL-STD. Pricing for the RTS starts at $ 1.58 each/100 and the RTS with shunt at $ 1.96 each/100.  For more specs and details, peruse the RTS datasheet, call 800-848-2600, or email [email protected].

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