Pocket-Size Platform Measures Subscriber Throughput

EXFO claims it’s EX1 is the first industry’s pocket-sized solution that enables technicians to measure subscribers' real-life throughput up to full line rate Gigabit Ethernet using the Speedtest by Ookla measurement method. Multipurpose and portable, EX1 is said to be able to evolve with networks and provide active testing capabilities for complete service lifecycle testing and continuous- or on-demand performance monitoring at points of contention.

 

To confirm they get what they pay for, residential and business Ethernet subscribers measure actual throughput/speed using off-the-shelf solutions that fall short in capturing correct speed rates. Performing speed tests using a dedicated carrier-grade device is necessary to provide subscribers with reliable proof that speed delivered and service level agreement (SLA) rates match. In addition, with its future-proof, scalable platform, the EX1 is ready to support evolving applications such as Wi-Fi testing capabilities.

Sponsored by Digi-Key

Analog Devices ADIS16500/05/07 Precision Miniature MEMS IMU Available Now from Digi-Key

The Analog Devices’ ADI ADIS16500/05/07 precision miniature MEMS IMU includes a triaxial gyroscope and a triaxial accelerometer. Each inertial sensor in the MEMS IMU combines with signal conditioning that optimizes dynamic performance.

 

Intermittent quality issues take more time to troubleshoot, requiring a flexible monitoring solution that can stay in place as long as required. The EX1's portable design and impressive feature set (including over 140 tests) make it desirable for on-demand performance testing at any interval or any moment.

 

For more details and specs, an EX1 datasheet is available. Also, contact EXFO Inc. for more information.

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