Novel ICs Dabble In Velocity And Torque Control

Performance Motion Devices’ Juno Velocity and Torque Control Integrated Circuits (ICs) are trumpeted as the industry's first family of compact ICs for velocity and torque control capable of four-quadrant current control.  Designed for next-generation life science and healthcare applications, Juno ICs allegedly improve the ability of design engineers to achieve greater motor efficiency, precise current control, and accurate velocity profiles. Ideal for servo motor applications in liquid pumping or high-speed motor control, Juno ICs deliver smooth, quiet, and efficient motor operation over a wide range of operating conditions for brushless DC, DC brush, and step motors.

 

The Juno ICs eliminate the need for design engineers to use multi-component solutions that demand significant amounts of board space and firmware development. These methods have limited speed control accuracy that result in noisy motor operation and significant heat generation. Engineers have also been required to create their own interface and safety protocols. Juno ICs ensure safe and optimal motor performance and include over current, over and under voltage, over temperature, current integration limits, and communication monitoring.

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The Juno ICs are compact and available in a 64-pin TQFP or 56-pin VQFN package, and measure 10 mm x 10 mm or 7.2 mm x 7.2 mm, respectively. The Juno ICs are easy to deploy with preprogrammed motion commands and on-board intelligence. If you have the need, learn more.

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