NGA Innovation Summit Will Launch In Nashville Tennessee

The, carbon-based material known as graphene will likely play a large role in the future, yet very few outside the scientific community have heard of it. Graphene is a two-dimensional layer of carbon that conducts electricity better than copper; it is the thinnest material on the planet but 200 times stronger than steel, while also highly flexible and completely transparent to the human eye. Innovators will gather in Nashville to share ideas and challenges related to the emerging technology for the first-ever Graphene Innovation Summit & Expo Oct. 29-31, hosted by the National Graphene Association (NGA).

 

Several organizations will be highlighting their innovations at the Summit, which will feature two days of plenary talks, panel discussions, graphene product and idea showcases, investor pitches and interaction with exhibitors. NGA’s CEO, Kevin J. Seddon, expects the event to attract a host of stakeholders, including leaders in research and development as well as finance, government and education, among others.

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Tens of thousands of graphene patents have already been awarded to companies including Samsung and IBM. Companies today are using graphene in products ranging from car bodies and safety equipment in auto racing to bio sensors and thermo-regulating garments in the health and fitness sector. For more information on the National Graphene Association or to register for the event, visit the NGA website.

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