Nano Diamonds Boost Polymer Performance In 3D Printing

Finnish nano diamond manufacturer Carbodeon and Dutch 3D printing specialist Tiamet 3D have announced the first nano-diamond-enhanced filaments for 3D printing. The filaments are based on a jointly-patented technology which significantly improves the mechanical and thermal properties of 3D printed items. “Nanodiamonds offer the potential to make 3D-printed components that perform as well as or better than comparable injection molded components, but with massive cost reductions and production speed improvements, especially for prototype, on-demand and short run production,” said Carbodeon CEO Dr Vesa Myllymäki.

 

3D printing using improved-performance thermoplastics has potential in almost all manufacturing environments, but especially in electronics, automotive and aerospace industries. As well as improving thermal management, conductivity and tensile strength of the base polymer, nanodiamonds can increase the glass transition temperature of the product or component to achieve more robust and reliable polymer products, suitable for more challenging environments.

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The first Carbodeon/Tiamet 3D filaments will be polylactic acid (PLA) based, with further development focused on higher-performance thermoplastics. The companies have signed a strategic partnership agreement on joint filament development, along with an agreement for Carbodeon to supply nanodiamond materials to Tiamet 3D. Ready to get engaged with nanodiamonds? Then visit  Carbodeon and Tiamet 3D

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