N-Channel MOSFET Driver Provides 100% Duty Cycle Capability

The LTC7000/-1 high-side N-channel MOSFET driver operates up to a 150V supply voltage. Its internal charge pump enhances an external N-channel MOSFET switch, allowing it to remain on indefinitely. The device operates over a 3.5V to 135V, 150V-peak input supply range with a 3.5V to 15V bias voltage range. It detects an overcurrent condition by monitoring the voltage across an external sense resistor placed in series with the drain of the external MOSFET. When the LTC7000/-1 senses that the switch current has exceeded a preset level, a fault flag is asserted and the switch is turned off for a period of time set by an external timing capacitor. After a predetermined time period, the LTC7000/-1 automatically retries. The LTC7000 is available in a MSOP-16 and the LTC7000-1 is available in a MSOP-16 (12) with four leads removed for high voltage spacing. Three operating junction temperature grades are available, with extended and industrial versions from –40 to 125°C, high temp automotive version from –40°C to 150°C and a military grade from –55°C to 150°C. Price starts at $2.75 each/1,000. For more information, visit http://www.linear.com/product/LTC7000

 

Linear Technology Corp.

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Milpitas, CA.

800-454-6327

http://www.linear.com

 

Analog Devices Inc.

Norwood, MA

800-445-2564

781-329-4700

http://www.analog.com

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