Museums Harness Sensors & IoT For Collection Protection

Swift Sensors, supplier of plug-and-play cloud wireless sensors systems for Industrial IoT, is helping museums protect and preserve artifacts and exhibits. Chicago’s Adler Planetarium recently deployed a full Swift Sensors wireless monitoring system to protect one of the world’s largest collections of historic scientific instruments.

The museum’s internet of things (IoT) system uses 81 wireless sensors to take 240 measurements in exhibit halls and storage rooms and send the data to the cloud. Staffers can review the secure data on their phones, tablets, and computers. Each battery-powered sensor is the size of a key fob, so it can fit almost anywhere in or near an exhibit.

The Swift Sensors Museum Starter Kit helps institutions test out the technology on a trial basis. It includes two temperature, humidity and dew point sensors, a bridge to collect data and store it in the cloud, a cloud-based system console, and a Swift Sensors Professional Cloud Subscription. American Alliance of Museums members receive a 25% discount on the Museum Starter Kit. For more details, visit Swift Sensors.

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