Multi-sensors Gaining Share of the Detector Market

The mass-market trend in North America and Western Europe is toward the increased use of multi-sensor detectors. This move to combine multiple technologies into a single detector is more efficient and helps reduce false alarms. In its latest publication, the World Market for Fire Detection and Suppression Products, IHS forecasts the global multi-sensor detector market to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 7.0% from 2013 to 2018.

Multi-sensors are slowly replacing the common optical detector. The most popular combination of technologies is smoke and heat, mainly because of the competitive price point. An added benefit is end-users can save on installation costs. One product can provide the coverage of multiple detectors, so fewer pieces overall need to be installed. In high labor wage areas, this can offer real savings.

Also contributing to growth in the multi-sensor market is the increasing awareness of carbon monoxide (CO) detection in residential and commercial applications. Parts of the United States and Europe have passed legislation that requires CO detection in single- and multi-family homes, and some healthcare facilities. Instead of installing individual smoke and CO detectors, combination units are becoming a popular choice to meet the legislative requirements.

While sales of optical detectors are expected to remain dominant in 2018, the shift to multi-sensors is picking up steam. Better detection capabilities, a price that will continue to fall and end-user demand will all play a role in this markets projected increase of nearly $100 million over the next five years.

IHS Technology: http://www.ihs.com
 

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