Morgan Advanced Materials Ceramic Pins

Ceramic Pins from Morgan Advanced Materials
Morgan Advanced Materials

Morgan Advanced Materials, United Kingdom, now offers ceramic pins for sensors, circuit breakers and electronic passive components in a variety of custom material formulations and blends, including alumina and steatite. The pins are ideally suited for manufacturers of pressure sensors, passive components such as wirewound resistors and inductors, and industrial circuit breakers used in the automotive and aerospace sectors. Manufactured in North America, the materials offer a cost effective solution for a wide variety of applications.

Morgan’s micro extrusion capabilities enable production of ceramic pins in sizes ranging from 0.019-inch to 0.100-inch. The maintenance of extremely tight tolerances through the sintering process prevents the need for secondary machining processes like diamond grinding, which may potentially affect the material’s surface porosity or condition. The company has a variety of alumina formulations for applications that can withstand movement or force, with maximum working temperatures up to 3090°F (1700°C). Less expensive steatite options are available for lower temperature applications up to 1832°F (1000°C).

Contact Info

Company: Morgan Advanced Materials
Country: United Kingdom (UK)
Phone number: +44 (0) 1299 827000

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