Masimo Announces CE Marking for RAS-45 Sensor

NEUCHATEL, Switzerland ---- Masimo announces the CE Marking of RAS-45, a single-use adult and pediatric acoustic respiration sensor for rainbow Acoustic Monitoring (RAM) of respiration rate (RRa).

Continuous monitoring of respiration rate is especially important for post-surgical patients receiving patient-controlled analgesia for pain management. The Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation (APSF) and The Joint Commission recommend continuous oxygenation and ventilation monitoring for all patients receiving opioid-based pain medications.1,2 RAM noninvasively and continuously measures respiration rate using an innovative adhesive sensor with an integrated acoustic transducer, such as Masimo’s RAS-125c and now RAS-45, that is applied to the patient’s neck. Using acoustic signal processing that leverages Masimo’s breakthrough Signal Extraction Technology (SET®), the respiratory signal is separated and processed to display continuous acoustic respiration rate (RRa). RRa has been shown to be accurate, easy-to-use, and reliable, and to enhance patient compliance.3,4 RRa may facilitate earlier detection of respiratory compromise and patient distress, offering a breakthrough in patient safety for post-surgical patients and for procedures requiring conscious sedation.4

RAS-45 is designed to facilitate placement on and improve attachment to the neck, but with a smaller adhesive profile than the RAS-125c. It is flexible and uses a transparent adhesive. Like the RAS-125c, it operates with Masimo MX technology boards to measure RRa and display the acoustic respiration wave form. RAS-45 maintains the same performance parameters, range, and accuracy specifications as RAS-125c. Both sensors are for patients who weigh more than 10 kg.

Additional information is available at http://www.masimo.com
 

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