Machine Vision Sales in North America Grow 10% in First Quarter 2014

Ann Arbor, MI – Total sales of machine vision components and systems grew 10% in first quarter 2014, according to new statistics issued by AIA, the industry’s trade group.

Total machine vision sales include sales of machine vision components and systems. Total machine components grew 29% in the first quarter, while total machine vision systems grew six percent. These results are in contrast to what we saw last year, when machine vision systems led the way in terms of growth.

Every component and system category increased in first quarter 2014, but cameras (36%), lighting (32%), and software (25%) led the way.

“We’re pleased to see such a positive start to the year for machine vision sales in North America,” said AIA President Jeff Burnstein. “It’s particularly promising to see machine vision components post such a strong quarter, and we’re hopeful that continues throughout the year.”

“Our most recent survey of industry experts shows that AIA membership is indeed optimistic about machine vision components,” added Alex Shikany, AIA’s Director of Market Analysis. “Respondents expect every component category, except for imaging boards, to grow over the next six months.”

In addition to its sales tracking report, AIA currently offers its 2013 Machine Vision Camera Market Study, which is available at a discounted rate to AIA members. AIA also prepares studies on special topics, such as Life Sciences, which it makes available to all AIA members free of charge on Vision Online.

For more information on AIA, contact AIA Headquarters at (734) 994-6088 and visit http://www.visiononline.org

For more details about Association for Advancing Automation (A3), visit http://www.a3automate.org

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