Lumitex Introduces Cut-2-Size Backlighting Kit

Strongsville, OH --- Lumitex announces the availability of its first-ever, innovative Cut-2-Size Backlighting Kit. Created for design engineers who need quick prototype backlighting for membrane switches, keypads, overlays, LCDs or other graphics displays, the Cut-2-Size Backlighting Kit is available from Lumitex. It can also be used for fast-turn, small volume production.

Requiring no tooling or non-recurring engineering (NRE), the Cut-2-Size Kits include either 0.45mm or 0.3mm thin, 6” x 11”, Clad Flat Fiber™ (CFF) flexible optical sheets; and printed circuit boards with eight, white side-fire LEDs that can be powered by a standard 9VDC supply. The polycarbonate panels can be easily cut into any shape or size using standard cutting tools such as scissors or a knife. The LED board can also be cut, creating two separate boards. An adhesive strip on the circuit board acts to stabilize the transition edge and allow better coupling of the light guide panel.

Clad Flat Fiber technology offers high brightness and requires less power than LED arrays and most LED light guides. It also provides consistent performance in hazardous environments, withstanding a wide temperature range, high humidity, shock and vibration.

For more information:
Lumitex
440-973-0359
[email protected]
http://www.lumitex.com/cut-2-size
 

Free Newsletter

Like this article? Subscribe to FierceSensors!

The sensors industry is constantly changing as innovation runs the market’s trends. FierceSensors subscribers rely on our suite of newsletters as their must-read source for the latest news, developments and analysis impacting their world. Register today to get sensors news and updates delivered right to your inbox.
Read more on

Suggested Articles

Swan letter also calls for continued support of immigration programs needed by Intel and other tech companies

Analysts see 12% wearable growth annually in coming years, as sensors for wearables get traction in hearables, clothing, and health monitoring

FAA’s recent decision ungrounding MAX aircraft could be appealed; a federal lawsuit seeks full release of FAA review of Boeing updates, including MCAS