Low-Power Wi-Fi SoC Accelerates IoT Adoption

Dialog Semiconductor’s FC9000 Wi-Fi system on chip (SoC) is designed for battery-powered IoT devices such as smart door locks, video monitoring systems, smart thermostats, and wireless sensors. Enabling direct connectivity to Wi-Fi networks, the device supports a battery lifetime greater than one year.

According to the company, devices running on Zigbee, ZWave or Bluetooth standards needed to be paired with an expensive and cumbersome gateway or smartphone to enable connectivity to the cloud, adding complexity and unnecessary costs for IoT adoption. The FC9000 overcomes these issues as the market moves towards Wi-Fi.

The SoC relies on proprietary power-saving algorithms that allow it to operate on just a few microamps. It also features a separate hardware accelerated encryption engine that increases the speed of Wi-Fi encryption, such as WPA2-Enterprise and Personal. This support also extends to higher layer commercial grade security encryption, such as TLS, for enabling HTTPs, the modern standard for website security.

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The FC9000 is a full offload system for Wi-Fi networking, running the end device’s application code alongside its own. It does not require an external network processor or microcontroller but can operate alongside a microcontroller if desired. The SDK included with the device allows for rapid design implementation with a generous provision of 1.6MB of SRAM on-board memory.

The FC9000 SoC is in volume production today and available as an SoC or integrated module. Both are Wi-Fi Certified. The modules are FCC, IC, and CE certified for worldwide operation. Checkout the FC9000 datasheet.

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